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Posts Tagged ‘Tourism’

I like vintage postcards. Not just for their images but for the stories they tell. And I believe that postcard writing is truly and art form. A lost art at that.

Sheri, a twitter friend, tweeted The lost art of postcard writing earlier this month and we began talking about postcards over twitter. She set up a PO Box so her Facebook friends could send postcards to her kids and I thought that was a wonderful idea!

I asked her for her PO Box address so I could also send them one. Well suburbia isn’t the easiest place to pick up a postcard so it took me a few weeks to find postcards. But I finally found some at the Indiana Welcome Center in Hammond, IN. By the way, if you’re looking for The Christmas Story memorabilia, go to their gift shop.

The plan is to regularly mail postcards to Sheri’s kids. Hopefully I’ll be able to travel more so the postcards won’t all be of Indiana or Chicago but I stocked up at the Welcome Center just in case. If you’re interested in sending them a postcard, please message me for their address. (more…)

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#tourismchat is a biweekly twitter chat focusing on Social Media in the Tourism Industry. It’s held on Thursdays at 2pm CST. If you’re not familiar with it, this is your personal invitation to participate, or at least lurk, in the chat!

How?

If you use TweetDeck or HootSuite, set up a search column for #tourismchat. My preference is TweetDeck as it brings in new tweets automatically in real-time.

If you don’t use TweetDeck or can’t keep up with the constant tweets, try TweetChat. This site automatically adds the #tourismchat hashtag at the end of every tweet, which is a great benefit. Tip: sign in with your twitter account and move the refresh speed down to 5 seconds.

Why?

  1. #tourismchat is FREE.
  2. CVBs and others in the tourism industry share their social media knowledge and experience. For free.
  3. It’s like attending specific social media sessions at tourism conferences but better.
  4. And if you needed another reason:

So please join us this Thursday, September 1, at 2pm CST when we chat about the use of multimedia (obtaining and using photos, videos, podcasts, etc) in the tourism social space.

Of course I’m partial to #tourismchat but feel free to check out these other Travel Chats on Twitter too.

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Maps are an integral part of tourism marketing and creating a custom Google Map is one of the easiest ways to highlight specific parts of a destination. Maps can be made for thematic itineraries, hotels or even for things to see or do around a convention center. They can range from being rather simple with a just an address, website and/or description for each venue to something more complex featuring photos, videos and blog posts.

Tourism Queensland ran a Best Job in the World campaign in 2009 and the winner, Ben Southall, has embarked on another Queensland adventure, The Best Expedition in the World, which started in May and will be completed in September. A Google Map was created to show his 1600km kayak journey from the Town of 1770 to Cooktown, retracing the route of Captain James Cook.

The journey is an incredible feat on its own but the Best Expedition in the World Map is a mashup of Flickr photos, YouTube videos, blog posts and breathtaking 360° views. (more…)

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Oregon, a front-runner in social media, just launched Ask Oregon, a program that connects visitors to Oregon experts through twitter, Facebook and email.

There are 14 ambassadors who are experts in areas around the state as well as interests such as cycling, rafting, fishing, golf, wine, beer and history. These experts have credibility and only enhance the customer service experience that is part of social media for tourism organizations.

Just send a tweet with the #askOR hashtag, post your question on their Facebook page or head to their special Ask Oregon Facebook tab for a link to send an email. It’s a great concept!

Well done, Oregon!

Disclosure: Ask Oregon is managed though Travel Oregon and Sparkloft Media, my employer.

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I don’t take myself seriously most of the time so when I saw that I was at the top of this Tourism Professionals on Twitter list, I was blown away. Especially since I’ve been taking a lot of personal twitter breaks lately.

I was in Portland for work when this list was published so I didn’t have time to fully absorb all of it. And then there were #DMAI11 tweets, #notatDMAI11 tweets and an amazing #notatDMAI11 twitter chat.

So when I was searching for something else, I happened to come across Dave‘s tweet again last week. This may be the all-time nicest thing anyone tweeted about me/my profession. Thanks, Dave!!

This list was compiled by Betsy Decillis, an incredible friend and my #tourismchat partner in crime. And no, I didn’t bribe her for my ranking. The methodology she used is based on a combination of the percentage of tourism followers and klout. Check out the entire list: Top 100 Most Influential Tourism Professionals on Twitter (more…)

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Calling all CVBs!!

I’m researching how CVBs are using social media, especially with niche accounts, and could use your help. Please take a few minutes to send me the names/URLs of your social media accounts in this google doc or use the form below.

Thank you!

(more…)

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Tweeting DIYA lot has changed in the social media world since October 2010 but most of the basics in Hashtaggery (how to create a hashtag for your event) have remained the same. Here’s an update:

1. Think: choose a hashtag that can easily correlate to your event

What type of abbreviations can you use? If there will be live-tweeting at your event, make sure you choose something that can be easily typed. Keep it short and sweet but not so short that it becomes confusing.

Should you use the year in it? I’ve seen a lot of hashtags that use “2010″ or just “10″ as a date. Twitter search history lasts only a few days so there’s no need to differentiate your annual events by adding the year to your hashtag. Remember that people will be live-tweeting and it takes an extra step to add numbers on a mobile device.

The thought process behind this hasn’t changed. Since my original post, I’ve upgraded to an Android phone (from a Blackberry) so typing numbers in a hashtag is more difficult now but my keyboard (Swiftkey) auto-suggests words and hashtags so leaving off numbers in a hashtag is not as crucial. Just keep in mind whether you want to use the hashtag year-round or only specifically for the conference.

2. Research: are your choices already being used? (more…)

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